Africa for Women's Rights | L'afrique pour les droits des femmes

To content | To menu | To search

Tag - Burundi

Entries feed - Comments feed

Thursday 10 December 2009

International Human Rights Day: Firm Political Will Required to End Violence Against Women

VERSION FRANÇAISE

The Coalition of the Campaign “Africa for Women's Rights Ratify and Respect” demands immediate action from governments

10 December 2010, Nairobi, Paris - On International Human Rights Day, as NGO's across Africa conclude their actions marking 16 days of activism against gender violence, the Coalition of the Campaign “Africa for Women's Rights Ratify and Respect” calls upon all African governments to take urgent measures to eliminate violence against women.

Africa is the continent that records the highest levels of violence perpetrated against women. Patriarchy, sexism and misogyny are widespread across the 53 countries. Harmful traditional practices, insufficient legal protection and extensive impunity for acts of violence perpetuate violations of women's rights. In periods of conflict or political unrest, crimes of sexual violence continue to be committed on a massive scale.

From November 25th (International Day on Violence Against Women) until 10th December (International Human Rights Day), NGO's have been intensively campaigning for an end to such atrocities. The Coalition of the Campaign “Africa for Womens Rights Ratify and Respect” lends its support to the theme for this year's mobilisation: Commit ▪ Act ▪ Demand: We CAN End Violence Against Women! The Campaign emphasizes the need for all actors, starting with governments, to give full support to efforts to end sexual and gender based violence.

The Coalition of the Campaign issues specific recommendations to the governments of Burundi, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Togo and Mali, which have been a particular focus of the Campaign in 2009, and where sexual and domestic violence remain highly prevalent.

In Burundi, perpetrators of sexual and domestic violence benefit from widespread impunity. There is no specific law prohibiting domestic violence. Extrajudicial settlement of cases of rape favours practices such as marriage between the rapist and the victim. Amongst the root causes of persistent violence, are profoundly discriminatory laws, in particular provisions of the Code of the Person and the Family and the Penal Code, as well as the continued application of customary law.

The Coalition of the Campaign calls on the government of Burundi to:

  • abolish or reform discriminatory laws including provisions of the Code of the Person and the Family and the Penal Code and customary laws;
  • enact legislation criminalizing domestic violence;
  • adopt a comprehensive strategy to combat all forms of violence against women; and
  • ratify the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women in Africa.

In Botswana, customary law, which profoundly discriminates against women, is applied alongside common law. While Botswana has adopted legislation criminalising violence against women (Domestic Violence Act 2008), under customary law men are perceived to have the right to “chastise” their wives. Furthermore, the Domestic Violence Act contains significant gaps. For example, it does not penalise marital rape.

The Coalition of the Campaign therefore calls on the government of Botswana to:

  • abolish or reform discriminatory laws including customary laws and ensure that common law is superior to customary law;
  • enact legislative provisions criminalizing marital rape; and
  • adopt a comprehensive strategy to combat all forms of violence against women.

In Democratic Republic of Congo, crimes of sexual violence continue to be committed on a massive scale, both in areas of ongoing conflict and areas of relative stability. Two laws on sexual violence adopted in 2006 have so far been ineffectively implemented and perpetrators continue to enjoy impunity. Harmful traditional practices such as dowry, levirate, polygamy, forced and early marriage, female genital mutilation and domestic violence, remain widespread.

The Coalition of the Campaign calls on the Democratic Republic of Congo to implement the recent recommendations on combating violence against women issued by the United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (November 2009). In particular, it urges the government to:

  • accelerate the adoption of the law on gender equality and reform of discriminatory provisions within the Family Code;
  • enact legislation prohibiting harmful traditional practices;
  • raise the minimum age of marriage for girls to 18 years;
  • implement the comprehensive strategy against sexual violence endorsed by the Government in April 2009; and
  • ensure provision of compensation, psychological support and health care to survivors of sexual violence.

In Mali, discriminatory laws, in particular in the area of the family, place women in a situation of extreme vulnerability. Harmful traditional practices persist including female genital mutilation, forced and early marriage and levirate. Following ten years of drafting, reforms to the Family Code were passed by parliament in August 2009 but, following widespread protests by ultra-conservative groups, the President sent the law back to Parliament for a second reading.

The Coalition of the Campaign therefore calls on the government of Mali to:

  • ensure that the proposed reforms of the Family Code, are adopted, in full, without further delay;
  • criminalise female genital mutilation and marital rape;
  • adopt the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women in Africa.

In Togo, discriminatory customs and traditions, including forced and early marriage, female genital mutilation, ritual bondage, levirate and repudiation are widespread. Patriarchal attitudes persist that consider the physical chastisement of family members, including women, acceptable. Proposed reforms to the Personal and Family Code, which would amend some of the discriminatory provisions, have been stalled.

The Coalition of the Campaign therefore calls on the government of Togo to:

  • reform all discriminatory legislation including the Personal and Family Code
  • enact legislation on domestic violence, including marital rape, and on all forms of sexual abuse, including sexual harassment
  • introduce immediate measures to modify and/or eliminate customs and cultural practices that discriminate against women
  • ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.

“As we mark International Human Rights Day, we remind all governments of the fundamental rights of women to be protected from all forms of violence. It is abhorrent that women continue to suffer such atrocities, and on a daily basis, whilst governments fail to act”, stated Souhayr Belhassen, FIDH President. “Eliminating violence against women is a question, first and foremost, of political will”, she concluded.

Journée internationale des droits de l'Homme : Une volonté politique ferme est nécessaire pour mettre fin aux violences contre les femmes

ENGLISH VERSION

La coalition de la campagne « L’Afrique pour les droits des femmes : Ratifier et Respecter » demande des mesures immédiates aux gouvernements

10 Décembre 2010, Nairobi, Paris – À l’occasion de la Journée internationale des droits de l’Homme, et alors que les ONG à travers l’Afrique concluent leurs actions marquant les 16 jours d’activisme contre les violences à l’égard des femmes, la Coalition de la Campagne « L’Afrique pour les droits des femmes : Ratifier et Respecter » appelle tous gouvernements africains à prendre des mesures urgentes pour éliminer les violences contre les femmes.

L’Afrique est le continent qui enregistre les niveaux les plus élevés de violences commises contre les femmes. Des pratiques traditionnelles néfastes, une protection juridique insuffisante et une impunité généralisée perpétuent les violences à l’égard des femmes. En période de conflit ou d’instabilité politique, les crimes sexuels continuent d’êtres commis à grande échelle.

Du 25 novembre (Journée internationale pour l'élimination de la violence à l'égard des femmes) au 10 décembre (Journée internationale des droits de l’Homme), les ONG ont fait activement campagne pour mettre fin à de telles atrocités. La Coalition de la Campagne « L’Afrique pour les droits des femmes : Ratifier et Respecter » prête son soutien au thème de mobilisation de cette année : S’engager – Agir – Demander : Nous POUVONS mettre fin aux violences contre les femmes ! La Campagne souligne les besoins pour tous les acteurs, en commençant par les gouvernements, de donner leur entier soutien aux efforts entrepris pour mettre fin aux violences basées sur le genre et violences sexuelles.

La Coalition de la campagne a émis des recommandations spécifiques aux gouvernements du Burundi, du Botswana, de la République démocratique du Congo (RDC), du Togo et du Mali qui ont été l’objet d’une attention particulière lors de la Campagne de 2009.

Au Burundi, les auteurs de violences sexuelles et domestiques bénéficient d’une impunité généralisée. Il n’y a pas de loi spécifique pour réprimer les violences domestiques. Le règlement extrajudiciaire des cas de viols favorisent le mariage entre l’auteur du viol et la victime. Parmi les causes de ces violences persistantes se trouvent des lois profondément discriminatoires, et en particulier les dispositions du Code des personnes et de la famille ainsi que du Code pénal, de même que les coutumes locales.

La Coalition de la campagne demande donc au gouvernement du Burundi de :

  • d' abroger ou réformer les lois discriminatoires, notamment les dispositions du Code des personnes et de la Famille, du Code Pénal et des coutumes locales ;
  • de mettre en place une législation criminalisant les violences domestiques ;
  • d' adopter une stratégie compréhensive de lutte contre toutes les formes de violence contre les femmes ; et,
  • de ratifier le Protocole additionnel à la Charte africaine des droits de l’Homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes

Au Botswana, le droit coutumier, qui contient de nombreuses dispositions particulièrement discriminatoires à l’égard des femmes, continue d’être appliqué à côté du droit commun. Selon le droit coutumier, par exemple, les hommes sont perçus en tant que détenteur d’un droit de « châtier » leur femmes.

La Coalition de la campagne demande donc au gouvernement du Botswana :

  • d' abroger ou réformer les lois discriminatoires de même que le droit coutumier et de s’assurer que le droit commun prévaut sur le droit coutumier ;
  • de criminaliser le viol conjugal et ;
  • d’adopter une stratégie compréhensive de lutte contre toutes les formes de violence contre les femmes.

En République démocratique du Congo, les crimes de violence sexuelle continuent d’être commis sur une large échelle, aussi bien dans les zones de conflits que dans les zones de relative stabilité. Les deux lois sur les violences sexuelles adoptées en 2006 ont été jusque là mise en place de manière inefficace et les auteurs de violence continuent de bénéficier de l’impunité. Les pratiques traditionelles néfastes telles que la dot, le lévirat, la polygamie, les mariages forcés ou précoces, les mutilations génitales féminines et les violences domestiques restent étendues.

La Coalition de la campagne demande à la République Démocratique du Congo de mettre en place les récentes recommandations sur la lutte contre les violences contre les femmes émises par le Comité sur les Droits Economiques, Sociaux et Culturels (Novembre 2009). En particulier, elle enjoint le gouvernement à :

  • accélérer l’adoption de la loi sur l’égalité des sexes et réformer les dispositions discriminatoires du Code de la Famille ;
  • mettre en place une législation qui interdit les pratiques traditionelles néfastes ;
  • élever l’âge minimum du mariage pour les filles à 18 ans ;
  • mettre en place la stratégie compréhensive de lutte contre les violences sexuelles adoptée par le gouvernement en Avril 2009 ; et
  • s’assurer de l’existence de réparation, de soutien psychologique et de soins médicaux pour les victimes de violence sexuelles.

Au Mali, les lois discriminatoires en particulier dans le domaine de la famille, mettent les femmes dans une situation de vulnérabilité extrême. Les pratiques traditionelles néfastes persistent, notamment les mutilations génitales féminines, les mariages forcés ou précoces et le lévirat. Après dix années de travail, la réforme du Code de la Famille a été adoptée par le Parlement en Août 2009 mais, suite à des protestations massives de la part de groupes ultraconservateurs, le Président a renvoyé la loi devant le Parlement pour une seconde lecture.

La Coalition de la campagne demande donc au gouvernement du Mali :

  • de s’assurer que la réforme proposée du Code de la Famille soit adoptée pleinement et sans délais ;
  • de criminaliser les mutilations génitales féminines et le viol entre époux ;
  • de ratifier le Protocole additionnel à la Charte africaine des droits de l’homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes.

Au Togo, les coutumes ou pratiques discriminatoires, notamment le mariage forcé ou précoce, les mutilations génitales féminines, le servage rituel, le lévirat et la répudiation sont étendues. Les attitudes patriarcales persistent et considèrent comme acceptable le châtiment des membres de la famille, notamment des femmes. Les réformes proposées du Code des Personnes et de la Famille qui auraient amendé certaines des dispositions discriminatoires ont été bloquées.

La Coalition de la campagne demande donc au gouvernement du Togo :

  • de réformer toutes les dispositions législatives discriminatoires notamment celles du code des Personnes et de la Famille
  • d' adopter des lois sur les violences domestiques, notamment le viol entre époux et sur toutes les formes d’abus sexuels, en particulier le harcèlement sexuel ;
  • d’ introduire immédiatement des mesures pour modifier et/ou éliminer les coutumes ou pratiques culturelles discriminatoires à l’encontre des femmes ;
  • de ratifier le Protocole additionnel à la Charte africaine des droits de l’homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes.

« Alors que nous célébrons la Journée internationale des droits de l’Homme, nous rappelons aux gouvernements le droit fondamental des femmes à être protégées contre toutes les formes de violence. Il est intolérable que les femmes soient encore victimes de telles atrocités, et ce de façon quotidienne, pendant que les gouvernements n’agissent pas », a souligné Souhayr Belhassen, Présidente de la FIDH. « Eliminer les violences contre les femmes avant tout une question de volonté politique » a-t-elle conclu.

Friday 10 July 2009

ENGAGEZ VOUS POUR LES DROITS DES FEMMES !

Communiqué de presse

La coalition l'Afrique pour les droits des femmes : ratifier et respecter lance un appel aux Etats n'ayant toujours pas ratifié le Protocole à la Charte africaine relatif aux droits de la femme en Afrique

english version

Le 11 juillet 2009 - Aujourd'hui le Protocole à la Charte africaine des droits de l'Homme et des peuples relatif aux droits de la femme en Afrique fêtera ses six ans. Adopté en 2003 à Maputo, Mozambique, et entré en vigueur en 2005, le Protocole a désormais été ratifié par la majorité des Etats africains qui se sont engagés à «éliminer toutes formes de discrimination à l'égard des femmes et (à) assurer la protection des droits de la femme». Cependant 26 Etats n'ont toujours pas ratifié le Protocole** .

Ce texte extrêmement important, à l'instar de la Convention des Nations unies sur l'élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l'égard des femmes (Convention CEDAW) ratifiée par la quasi totalité des Etats africains, offre un cadre juridique de référence pour assurer le respect des droits humains des femmes: élimination des discriminations et des pratiques néfastes; droit à la vie et à l'intégrité physique; égalité des droits en matière civile et familiale ; accès à la justice; droit de participation au processus politique; protection dans les conflits armés; droits économiques et protection sociale; droit à la santé et à la sécurité alimentaire, etc.

Convaincues que la lutte contre les discriminations et les violences à l'égard des femmes passe par la modification du cadre législatif, plus d'une centaine d'associations ont lancé, le 8 mars dernier la campagne «L'Afrique pour les droits des femmes: Ratifier et Respecter» appelant les États africains à ratifier le Protocole de Maputo et les autres instruments de protection des droits humains des femmes et à tout mettre en oeuvre pour garantir le respect de leurs dispositions.

Menée par la Fédération internationale des ligues des droits de l'Homme (FIDH), en coopération avec cinq organisations régionales africaines*** , cette campagne est soutenue par de nombreuses personnalités, telles les prix Nobel de la paix Mgr Desmond Tutu et Shirin Ebadi, les prix Nobel de littérature, Wole Soyinka et Nadine Gordimer, par les artistes Angélique Kidjo, Tiken Jah Fakoly et Youssou N'Dour ou encore par Mme Soyata Maiga, Rapporteure spéciale de la Commission africaine des droits de l'Homme et des peuples sur les droits des femmes en Afrique.

Toutes les organisations et personnalités signataires de la campagne vous appellent par conséquent à saisir l'occasion de l'anniversaire du Protocole à la Charte africaine sur les droits de la femme en Afrique pour le ratifier et ainsi affirmer vos engagements en faveur des droits des femmes dans vos pays.


** Algérie, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroun, Congo-Brazzaville, Côte d'Ivoire, Egypte, Erythrée, Ethiopie, Gabon, Guinée, Guinée équatoriale, Kenya, Madagascar, Maurice, Niger, Ouganda, République centrafricaine, Sao Tome et Principe, Sierra Leone, Somalie, Soudan, Swaziland, Tchad, Tunisie


*** Femmes Africa Solidarités (FAS), Women in Law in South Africa (WLSA), African Center for Democracy and Human Rights Studies (ACDHRS), Women in Law and Development in Africa (WILDAF) et Women's aid Collective (WACOL)

COMMIT TO THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN'S RIGHTS!

Press Statement

The coalition of the campaign "Africa for women's rights : ratify and respect !" issues a call to states that have failed to ratify the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women in Africa

version française

11 July 2009 - Today marks the sixth anniversary of the adoption of the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa. Adopted in 2003 in Maputo, Mozambique, the Protocol entered into force in 2005 and has now been ratified by the majority of African states which have thus committed themselves to “ensur(ing) that the rights of women are promoted, realised and protected”. However, 26 States have yet to ratify the Protocol** .

This Protocol, like the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW Convention) which has been ratified by almost all African States, provides a legal framework of reference for ensuring respect for women's human rights: elimination of discrimination and harmful practices; right to life and to physical integrity; equality in the domain of the family and civil rights; access to justice; right to participate in the political process; protection in armed conflicts; economic rights and social protection; right to health and food security, etc.

Convinced that the fight against discrimination and violence against women requires changes to the the legal framework, on 8 March this year over one hundred organisations launched the campaign “Africa for Women's Rights: Ratify and Respect” calling on African States to ratify the Maputo Protocol and the other women's rights protection instruments and to take all necessary measures to guarantee respect of their provisions.

Initiated by the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), in cooperation with five African regional organisations*** , this campaign has the support of patrons including the Nobel Peace Prize Laureates Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Shirin Ebadi, the Nobel Literature Prize Laureates Wole Soyinka and Nadine Gordimer, the artists Angélique Kidjo, Tiken Jah Fakoly and Youssou N'Dour, as well as Ms. Soyata Maiga, Special Rapporteur of the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa.

All the organisations involved in the campaign, and the campaign's patrons, call on the Presidents of the 26 states that have not yet done so, to seize the occasion of this anniversary to ratify the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women in Africa and thus affirm their commitments to respecting the rights of women.


** Algeria, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo-Brazzaville, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Niger, Saharawi Arabic Democratic Republic, Sao Tome et Principe, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Tunisia, Uganda


*** Femmes Africa Solidarités (FAS), Women in Law in South Africa (WLSA), African Center for Democracy and Human Rights Studies (ACDHRS), Women in Law and Development in Africa (WILDAF) et Women's aid Collective (WACOL)

Tuesday 19 May 2009

"L'union fait la force, en tant que burundaises, seules, on ne peut rien..."

Perpetue Kanyange, présidente du Centre de paix pour femmes nous parle de son expérience en tant que défenseure des droits des femmes au Burundi


Qu'est ce que d'être une femme défenseure au Burundi ? Quelles ont été les expériences les plus marquantes dans votre combat pour les droits des femmes ?

Etre une femme défenseure est une expérience positive. La lutte pour les droits des femmes aboutit, lentement, sur de nombreux plans à des résultats positifs. Toutefois, certains défis sont plus complexes que d'autres. En tant que défenseurs des droits des femmes nous devons nous unir et travailler en collaboration pour éviter de perdre du temps et de l'énergie à faire des plaidoyer qui n'aboutissent pas. Certains combats ne passent pas ou difficilement dans les mentalités et il ne faut pas s'y aventurer seul. L'une des expériences les plus marquantes a été le plaidoyer que nous avons mené pour le droit des femmes à hériter de la terre: nous nous sommes heurtées à des critiques provenant de toutes parts, de toute la population, politiques, collègues... Nous nous sentions découragées. Nous nous demandions si nous devions continuer, abandonner, attendre? Nous étions frustrées parce que cet enjeu représente la base de notre lutte. Les femmes subissent des violences parce qu'elles sont déconsidérées dans la société burundaise. Cette dévalorisation est dûe au fait qu'elles n'ont pas accès à la gestion du quotidien, en raison des discriminations, comme en matière d'héritage, qui les empêchent de devenir propriétaires.

Pourquoi vous êtes vous engagée dans la campagne « l'Afrique pour les droits des femmes »?

Nous avons évalué ce qui a été fait par les femmes au Burundi, et depuis l'indépendance, un pas considérable a été franchi. Les changements sont lents mais positifs. Mais nous nous rendons compte qu'individuellement, nous ne pouvons rien. L'union fait la force, en tant que burundaises, seules, on ne peut rien. Si nous nous unissions, notre plaidoyer aura plus de poids. De plus, certains problèmes ne peuvent se résoudre qu'au niveau africain. Le fait que notre pays s'engage dans de grands ensembles, sous-région, région, est positif. Certains problèmes, comme les discriminations et les violences à l'égard des femmes sont des défis communs que nous devons affronter ensemble. Les luttes régionales permettent de faire pression sur le Burundi, qui ne veut pas être stigmatisé comme un pays ne respectant pas les droits de l'homme, dont les droits des femmes font partie.

Quelles sont d'après vous les luttes prioritaires à mener au Burundi pour les droits des femmes?

Les textes internationaux doivent être ratifiés, les textes nationaux doivent respecter l'égalité entre les hommes et les femmes et ne plus comporter de discrimination envers les femmes. Et ils doivent surtout être appliqués! Les domaines où un changement est particulièrement nécessaire sont celui de la gouvernance politique où la représentation des femmes est faible. Nous devons lutter pour décrocher quelques postes, mais rien n'est garantit par la constitution. On se réfère souvent à la coutume. Par ailleurs, le code pénal vient d'être révisé, il comporte des améliorations, mais ce n'est pas suffisant. Avant, les crimes envers les femmes étaient banalisés et les auteurs n'étaient pas sanctionnés. Maintenant, la répression est plus forte, mais des progrès sont encore à faire concernant les définitions des infractions à caractère sexuel et leur répression.

Si vous aviez l'occasion de rencontrer Pierre Nkurunziza, le Président de votre pays, quelles seraient vos revendications principales en tant que présidente du Centre de paix pour femmes et en tant que femme citoyenne du Burundi ?

Je lui demanderai de mettre en application tous les textes qui protègent les femmes, notamment la politique nationale « genre », pour que les femmes puissent se sentir libre de participer à la politique, et que le genre ne soit plus une question annexe.

Si vous pouviez changer une seule chose (une loi, une politique, une pratique...) pour les femmes dans votre pays, laquelle serait elle ?

Ce serait l'accès de la femme à la succession. A partir de là nous pourrions avancer, la femme serait valorisée.

Thursday 5 March 2009

Le Burundi doit réformer son Code de la famille, respecter la criminalisation des violences sexuelles et mettre fin aux pratiques traditionnelles néfastes

Au Burundi, le Code de la famille en vigueur contient de nombreuses dispositions discriminatoires à l’égard des femmes, notamment en matière d’héritage, de régimes matrimoniaux, de droit de propriété et de transmission de la nationalité.

La campagne appelle le gouvernement du Burundi à :

Accélérer la réforme de ce texte, en discussion depuis 8 ans, et la soumettre au parlement dans les meilleurs délais;

Mettre fin aux pratiques traditionnelles néfastes qui instaurent des discriminations envers les femmes et les filles et menacent leur santé, et mettre en application le nouveau code pénal qui érige les violences sexuelles au rang de crime;

Ratifier le Protocole à la CEDAW et le Protocole à la CADHP (ces textes ont seulement été signés par le Burundi).