Africa for Women's Rights | L'afrique pour les droits des femmes

To content | To menu | To search

RATIFY! / RATIFIER!



The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), as well as the Protocol to African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa provide a legal framework to combat violations of women's human rights. By ratifying these instruments, States commit themselves to take all necessary measures to end discrimination and protect women's human rights.

Whilst almost all African states have ratified CEDAW (51 of 53), 8 states have entered reservations to this Convention, which undermine the very principle of non­discrimination.
35 states have not yet ratified the Optional Protocol to CEDAW, which allows individual women whose rights have been violated to seek redress before the CEDAW Committee, in charge of monitoring the implementation of the Convention.
Finally, 5 years after its adoption, 28 states have still not ratified the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People's rights on the Rights of Women in Africa.


RATIFIER !


La Convention pour l'élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l'égard des femmes (CEDAW), ainsi que le Protocole à la Charte africaine des droits de l'homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes offrent un cadre légal pour lutter contre les violations des droits humains des femmes. En ratifiant ces instruments, les Etats s'engagent à prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour mettre fin aux discriminations et faire respecter les droits humains des femmes.

Si presque tous les Etats africains ont ratifié la CEDAW (51 sur 53), 8 de ces Etats y ont tout de même émis des réserves allant à l'encontre du principe même de  non-discrimination.
De plus, 35 Etats n'ont pas ratifié le Protocole facultatif à la CEDAW qui permet et encadre les recours individuels des femmes dont les droits ont été violés devant le Comité CEDAW, chargé de surveiller la bonne mise en oeuvre de la Convention.
Enfin, 5 ans après son adoption, 28 Etats n'ont toujours pas ratifié le Protocole à la Charte africaine des droits de l'homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes.


Entries feed - Comments feed

Friday 5 March 2010

Dossier of Claims: Guinea-Bissau

RATIFY! While Guinea-Bissau has ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the Optional Protocol to CEDAW, it has still not ratified the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa (Maputo Protocol).

RESPECT! The Coalition of the Campaign is particularly concerned by the following continued violations of women’s rights in Guinea Bissau: persistence of discriminatory legislation; discrimination within the family, violence against women, including female genital mutilation; limited access to education, decision-making positions, health services and justice; and the particular vulnerability of women in rural areas.

SOME POSITIVE DEVELOPMENTS…

The Coalition of the Campaign acknowledges the recent adoption of several laws and policies aimed at improving respect for women’s rights, including:

  • The ratification in 2007 of the UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime and its Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children.
  • The ratification of the Optional Protocol to CEDAW in August 2009.
  • The introduction of strategies specifically targeting women in the National Strategy to Reduce Poverty.

BUT DISCRIMINATION AND VIOLENCE PERSIST

In Law

In Guinea-Bissau, although customary law does not represent a formal source of law, it continues to be applied alongside statutory law.

Statutory Law Although article 25 of the Constitution establishes equality between men and women, many provisions of the Civil Code and Family Code, inherited from the colonial period (1966) remain discriminatory, including: legal age of marriage: the legal age for marriage is 14 years for women and 16 years for men.

Marital authority: According to section 1674 of the Civil Code, the husband is the head of the family. He can thus represent his wife and make decisions on all matters concerning their married life. According to article 1686, a wife cannot do business without the consent of the husband, unless she is the administrator of all the couple’s assets.

Administration of the couple’s assets: Art. 1678 of the Civil Code establishes that the couple’s assets belong to the husband as head of the family. The wife can only administer assets if the husband is prevented from doing so.

The Coalition of the Campaign also regrets the absence of an explicit provision within the Constitution stipulating that international and regional conventions take precedence over national laws. Finally, although articles 24 and 25 of the Constitution guarantee the principles of equality and non-discrimination, there is no precise definition of the term discrimination, in conformity with CEDAW.

Customary Law

Numerous provisions of customary law are discriminatory and widely applied, includ- ing the authorisation of early and forced marriages, polygamy and levirate.

In Practice

The effective application of laws protecting women’s rights conflicts runs up against the widespread patriarchal conception of society, especially in rural areas.

Discrimination in the family

Society in Guinea-Bissau is deeply patriarchal and authority is perceived to reside with the father as head of the family. Polygamy remains a common practice. Concerning inheritance, customary law applied by certain ethnic groups is particularly discrimi- natory against women, allowing inheritance only from father to son.

Violence

In the absence of a specific law prohibiting violence against women, violence including incest and domestic violence are particularly widespread. Although rape is criminalised, the law is rarely applied and perpetrators rarely prosecuted, notably because of a lack of resources. Female genital mutilation (FGM), or “fanado”, is not criminalised. The World Health Organization estimates that around half of women in Guinea-Bissau have been subjected to FGM, rising to 70% or 80% in the rural Fula and Mandingue communities.

Specific vulnerability of rural women

The situation of rural women (the majority of women in Guinea-Bissau) remains extremely precarious. These women live in extreme poverty. They have very little access to education, to health and other basic social services, to land ownership, to credit or to technology. Moreover, discriminatory customs and harmful traditional practices, such as early and forced marriage, polygamy and levirate are particularly widespread in rural areas.

Obstacles to access to education

Despite efforts made by the government in the area of education, including school lunch programmes, a system of micro-loans for parents who send their daughters to school, literacy programmes aimed at women and girls and a resolution of the Council of Ministers in 2006 establishing a 50% quota for educational grants to girls, women and girls continue to suffer from a lack of access to education. According to UNICEF, only 11% of girls attend primary school and 6% secondary school (figures for the period 2000-2007).

Under-representation in political life

The level of participation of women in political and public life remains very low. During the last legislative elections in November 2008, only 10 women were elected out of 102 members of parliament (i.e. 10%).

Obstacles to access to health

Despite efforts made by the government to reduce maternal mortality rates and to combat the country’s HIV/Aids epidemic, women suffer from a lack of access to adequate health services, notably because of inadequate health infrastructure and human and financial resources. Thus, the maternal mortality rate is particularly high (1100 per 100,000 births in 2005).

Obstacles to access to justice

Women in Guinea-Bissau face extreme obstacles in seeking justice to assert their rights. This is principally due to a lack of information on women’s rights and the laws that protect them, the cost of proceedings and lack of training for police and legal personnel.

THE COALITION OF THE CAMPAIGN CALLS ON THE AUTHORITIES OF GUINEA-BISSAU TO:

  • Reform all discriminatory legislation in conformity with CEDAW, particularly the discriminatory provisions of the Civil Code and the Family Code; and ensure - by adopting a provision in the Constitution that international conventions have supremacy over national laws.
  • Harmonise civil and customary law, in conformity with CEDAW, in order to prohibit forced marriage, levirate marriage, genital mutilation and other traditional practices harmful to women.
  • Strengthen laws and policies to protect women from violence and support victims, including by adopting a specific law to prohibit all forms of violence against women, including domestic violence and spousal rape; adopting the draft law to criminalise FGM; strengthening the political and operational mandate of the Institute for Women and Children; and allocate additional financial resources to the fight against domestic violence.
  • Adopt measures aimed at eliminating obstacles to the education of girls and women, in particular by: taking measures ensure equal access to all levels of education ensuring, to retain girls within the education system, including pregnant; launching awareness programmes to overcome stereotypes and traditional attitudes; increasing the budget for education to improve educational infrastructure and teacher training; and establishing courses for adults aimed at reducing high levels of illiteracy among women.
  • Take measures to encourage women’s participation in public and political life, in particular by adopting the bill on quotas.
  • Take measures to ensure that all women have access to healthcare, including obstetrics and family planning, in particular by: ensuring access to contraception, particularly in rural areas; allocating additional funds to health, particularly in rural areas.
  • Take emergency measures to improve the particularly vulnerable situation of women in rural areas.
  • Take all necessary measures to ensure women access to justice, including by implementing training programmes for police and all legal personnel.
  • Adopt all necessary measures to reform or eliminate discriminatory cultural practices and stereotypes, including awareness-raising programmes targeting men and women, governmental, traditional and community leaders.
  • Ratify the Maputo protocol.
  • Implement all the recommendations issued by the CEDAW committee in August 2009.

PRINCIPAL SOURCES

  • Focal Point: LGDH
  • Recommendations from the CEDAW Committee, August 2009
  • UNICEF, www.unicef.org
  • Interparliamentary union: www.ipu.org
  • Wikigender, www.wikigender.org

THE CAMPAIGN FOCAL POINT IN GUINEA-BISSAU

  • Liga Guineense dos direitos do homen (LGDH)

Created in 1991, LGDH aims at the promotion and protection of human rights, defense of peace and conflict prevention. Through a public denunciation, advocacy, lobbying and legal assistance to victims, it seeks to contribute to respect of the rights of women and children, freedom of the press, freedom of expression and the fight against torture.www.lgdh.org

DOWNLOAD PDF - ENGLISH VERSION

TELECHARGER PDF - VERSION FRANÇAISE

Cahier d'Exigences: Guinée-Conakry

RATIFIER ! La Guinée a ratifié la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes (CEDAW) mais n’a toujours pas ratifié son Protocole facultatif. Si le Protocole à la Charte africaine des droits de l’Homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes en Afrique (Protocole de Maputo) a été signé en 2003 et ratifié par l’Assemblée nationale, les instruments de ratification n’ont toujours pas été déposés et demeurent au niveau du ministère des Affaires étrangères.

RESPECTER ! La Coalition de la campagne est particulièrement préoccupée par : la persistance de dispositions législatives discriminatoires ; les pratiques traditionnel- les néfastes, telles que les mariages précoces et forcés et les mutilations génitales féminines ; les violences à l’égard des femmes perpétrées en toute impunité ; l’accès limité des femmes à l’éducation, à la santé, au marché du travail, aux postes de décision et à la justice.

QUELQUES AVANCEES...

La nomination par décret de 168 femmes au sein de l’administration en 2008, suite à un intense travail de plaidoyer des organisations de la société civile.

MAIS LES DISCRIMINATIONS ET LES VIOLENCES PERSISTENT

Dans la Loi

En Guinée, si le droit écrit est le seul qui soit reconnu officiellement, l’utilisation dans certaines régions du droit coutumier du droit religieux crée une confusion qui nuit au respect des droits des femmes bien que le droit écrit soit officiellement le seul reconnu. Les projets de Code des personnes et de la famille, et de Code de l’enfant et la révision du Code civil en cours de préparation ou d’examen depuis plusieurs années, n’ont toujours pas été adoptés. Les textes en vigueur, en particulier le Code civil, contiennent de nombreuses dispositions discriminatoires, notamment :

Age légal du mariage (art. 280) : il est de 17 ans pour les femmes et 18 pour les hommes, le procureur de la République pouvant accorder des dispenses d’âge sous certaines conditions.

Autorité familiale (art. 324) : “le mari est le chef de famille”. De ce fait, le choix de la résidence lui appartient (art. 247 et 331) et il peut s’opposer à ce que son épouse exerce la profession de son choix (art. 328). En cas de divorce, la femme ne pourra obtenir la garde des enfants que jusqu’à l’âge de 7 ans (art. 359).

Adultère : est considéré comme un motif de divorce s’il est commis par l’épouse. Pour le mari, il ne sera considéré comme motif de divorce que si l’époux a “entretenu sa concubine au domicile conjugal” (art. 341 et 342).

Dans la Pratique

Discriminations dans la famille

Les mariages précoces et forcés demeurent répandus dans la plupart des groupes ethniques et religieux du pays, favorisés par la pression sociale et économique. En 2005, les Nations unies estimaient que 46 % des filles entre 15 et 19 ans étaient mariées, divorcées ou veuves. Concernant la polygamie, si elle est explicitement interdite par le Code civil (art. 315), il est cependant estimé qu’environ la moitié des femmes guinéennes sont concernées.

Violences

La violence domestique, tout comme le viol, constituent des infractions d’après le Code pénal mais dans la pratique, l’impunité généralisée limite considérablement la dénonciation de ces violences. Seuls 8 cas de viols ont été déclarés à la police en 2008. Le viol conjugal n’est pas criminalisé.

Le 28 septembre 2009 et les jours qui ont suivis, “au moins 109 femmes ont été victimes de viol et de violences sexuelles, y compris de mutilations sexuelles et d’es- clavage sexuel” selon la Commission internationale de l’ONU qui a enquêté sur le massacre qui s’est déroulé au stade de Conakry lors d’un rassemblement des forces de l’opposition. Aucun des auteurs et des principaux responsables identifiés par la Commission d’enquête comme étant de hauts dignitaires de la junte n’a fait jusqu’à présent l’objet de poursuites.

La Guinée est aussi un pays de départ, de transit et de destination pour les femmes et les enfants victimes de la traite à des fins de travail forcé et d’exploitation sexuelle à destination notamment de la Côte d’ivoire, du Bénin, du Sénégal, du Nigeria, de l’Afrique du Sud, de l’Espagne et de la Grèce. Bien que la loi guinéenne interdise le travail forcé et l’exploitation des personnes vulnérables, aucune mesure appropriée n’a été prise par le gouvernement pour lutter contre les causes et l’ampleur de la traite.

L’excision est illégale depuis 2000 mais particulièrement ancrée dans les pratiques traditionnelles, elle reste pratiquée dans toutes les régions, quelque soit leur niveau de développement socioéconomique. Les auteurs de mutilations génitales féminines (MGF) ne sont jamais sanctionnés. En 2005, il a été estimé que 96 % des femmes et des jeunes filles ont subi une forme de MGF.

Obstacles à l’accès à l’emploi et sous représentation dans la vie publique et politique

Bien que l’enseignement soit gratuit, la scolarisation de la population guinéenne en général, et celle des filles en particulier, demeure faible. Le taux d’analphabétisme des femmes et des filles est très élevé tout comme le taux d’abandon scolaire, notam- ment en raison des mariages ou grossesses précoces ainsi que du fait de la traite domestique. Le taux de scolarisation des filles en Guinée est de 69% dans le primaire et de 20 % dans le secondaire (2003-2008).

Obstacles à l’accès au travail et sous-représentation dans la vie publique et politique

En violation de l’article 18 de la Constitution guinéenne, l’accès des femmes à l’emploi n’est pas égal à celui des hommes, si bien qu’elles sont sur-représentées dans le secteur informel qui ne fournit aucune protection sociale. Elles sont sous-représentées dans la vie publique et politique et aux postes de décision, notamment à l’Assemblée nationale (19 femmes sur 114 députés), dans le service diplomatique et les organes locaux.

Obstacles à l’accès à la santé

Les femmes guinéennes, particulièrement dans les campagnes, peinent à accéder aux services de santé adéquats, en particulier de soins obstétriques et de planification familiale. Le taux de mortalité maternelle est l’un des plus élevés d’Afrique subsaharienne : (980 pour 100 000 naissances en 2006).

Obstacles à l’accès à la justice

L’accès à la justice est quasiment impossible notamment en raison du manque d’information sur les droits et les lois qui protègent les femmes, du fort taux d’analphabétisme chez les femmes, des coûts des procédures trop élevés... Le manque de formation des personnels de police et de justice entrave l’aboutissement des plaintes et dissuadent les victimes de recourir à la justice pour faire valoir leurs droits.

LA COALITION DE LA CAMPAGNE DEMANDE AUX AUTORITES DE GUINEE-CONAKRY DE :

  • Abroger ou réformer toutes les lois discriminatoires, en conformité avec la CEDAW, notamment les dispositions du Code civil et procéder, au plus vite, à l’adoption de nouvelles lois non-discriminatoires dans le domaine de la famille.
  • Harmoniser les droits écrit, coutumier et religieux, en conformité avec la CEDAW, et assurer qu’en cas de conflit juridique le droit écrit prévaut.
  • Renforcer les lois et politiques pour lutter contre les violences à l’égard des femmes, et notamment : amender le Code pénal pour étendre les dispositions concernant le viol au viol conjugal ; allouer des moyens financiers supplémentaires destinés à la lutte contre les violences domestiques; adopter une loi réprimant la traite des femmes.
  • Traduire sans délai devant la justice les auteurs et responsables des crimes perpétrés le 28 septembre 2009 et les jours suivants, notamment les responsables de viols et autres crimes sexuels. En cas d’impossibilité pour la justice guinéenne de poursuivre ces responsables, faciliter selon le principe de complémentarité, la saisine de la Cour Pénale Internationale (CPI) concernant ces crimes.
  • Prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour garantir l’indépendance de la justice.
  • Eliminer les obstacles à l’éducation des filles et des femmes, notamment en : assurant aux filles un accès égal à tous les niveaux d’éducation, leur maintien dans le système éducatif ; et des programmes de sensibilisation ; mettant en place des cours pour adultes destinés à réduire le fort taux d’analphabétisme féminin.
  • Favoriser l’accès à l’emploi pour les femmes et leur participation dans les sphères publiques et politiques, notamment : prendre des mesures spéciales temporaires, telles que des systèmes de quotas ; prendre des mesures pour mettre un terme aux discriminations à l’égard des femmes en matière d’emploi, conformément à l’article 18 de la Constitution.
  • Prendre des mesures destinées à assurer à toutes les femmes un accès à des soins de santé, y compris des services de soins obstétriques et de planification familiale.
  • Prendre les mesures nécessaires afin d’assurer l’accès des femmes à la justice et lutter contre l’impunité, notamment : mettre en place de campagnes de sensibilisation et de formation pour améliorer le niveau d’information des femmes sur leurs droits, ainsi que du personnel judiciaire, de police et de santé ; adopter une loi permettant aux organisations de défense des droits des femmes et de défense des droits humains de déposer plainte au nom des victimes et de se porter partie civile.
  • Réformer ou éliminer les pratiques culturelles et les stéréotypes qui discriminent les femmes, à travers des programmes de vulgarisation des textes de loi et de sensibilisation à destination des hommes et des femmes, y compris les responsables gouvernementaux, les chefs religieux, les dirigeants communautaires et traditionnels.
  • Ratifier le protocole facultatif à la CEDAW et achever le processus de ratification du protocole de Maputo.
  • Mettre en œuvre de toutes les recommandations émises par le comité de la CEDAW en août 2007.

PRINCIPALES SOURCES

  • Points focaux : OGDH, CONAG-DCF
  • Recommandations du Comité CEDAW, août 2007
  • ONU, Rapport de la Commission d’enquête internationale chargée d’établir les faits et les circonstances des événements du 28 septembre 2009 en Guinée, 2009
  • UNICEF, www.unicef.org
  • OIF, www.genre.francophonie.org

LES POINTS FOCAUX DE LA CAMPAGNE EN GUINÉE

  • Organisation guinéenne pour la défense des droits de l’Homme (OGDH)

L’OGDH a été créée en 1990 pour promouvoir et défendre les droits humains, via l’organisation de formations et de séminaires sur les droits de l’Homme et des rapports sur la situation des droits de l’Homme en Guinée.

  • Coalition nationale de Guinée pour les droits de la Citoyenneté des femmes (CONAG-DCF)

La CONAG-DCF est un regroupement de huit organisations de défense du droit des femmes en Guinée-Conakry. Elle mène des actions de terrain et de plaidoyer aux niveaux national et international.

DOWNLOAD PDF - ENGLISH VERSION

TELECHARGER PDF - VERSION FRANÇAISE

Cahier d'Exigences: Mauritanie

RATIFIER ! Bien que la Mauritanie ait ratifié la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes (CEDAW), l’Etat y a émis une réserve générale : seuls les articles en concordance avec la Sharia et avec la Constitution mauritanienne seraient appliqués. La Coalition de la campagne souligne que cette réserve viole le droit international, n’étant pas compatible avec l’objet et le but de la Convention.

La Mauritanie a ratifié le Protocole à la Charte africaine des droits de l’Homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes en Afrique (Protocole de Maputo), mais n’a pas ratifié le Protocole facultatif à la CEDAW.

RESPECTER ! La Coalition de la campagne est particulièrement préoccupée par: la persistance de dispositions législatives discriminatoires; les pratiques traditionnel- les néfastes, telles que les mariages précoces et forcés et les mutilations génitales féminines; les violences contre les femmes ; l’esclavage ; l’accès limité des femmes à l’éducation, au marché du travail et à la santé.

QUELQUES AVANCEES...

La Coalition de la campagne reconnaît quelques développements positifs relatifs aux droits des femmes au cours des dernières années, tels que :

  • L’adoption d’une loi en 2007 incriminant et réprimant les pratiques esclavagistes.
  • L’adoption en 2006 d’un décret établissant un quota de 20% de femmes sur les listes des candidats aux élections municipales et parlementaires. Grâce à cette réforme, les femmes représentent 33 % des élus dans les municipalités et respectivement 17,9 % et 17 % au Sénat et à l’Assemblée nationale.
  • L’adoption d’une disposition législative rendant l’accès à l’enseignement de base obligatoire pour tous les enfants âgés de 6 à 14 ans.

MAIS LES DISCRIMINATIONS ET LES VIOLENCES PERSISTENT

Dans la Loi

La législation mauritanienne demeure profondément discriminatoire, notamment dans le domaine de la famille. Parmi les dispositions législatives discriminatoires figurent :

Le code du statut personnel adopté en 2001 est discriminatoire à l’égard de la femme qui reste une éternelle mineure : Bien que l’âge du mariage soit fixé à 18 ans, un mineur peut être marié par son tuteur (weli ) “s’il y voit un intérêt évident” (art. 6). De plus, si l’article 5 définit le consentement comme une condition de validité du mariage, “le silence de la jeune fille vaut consentement”(art. 9). Une femme mariée n’a pas le droit de gérer ses biens, ni ceux de ses enfants sans l’accord de son mari. La répudiation de la femme, objet d’un chapitre entier, est autorisée, tout comme la polygamie si la femme ne s’y est pas opposée dans son contrat de mariage (art. 28). C’est le cas de la majorité des mariages, par manque de connaissance des droits. Dans le cadre d’un divorce pour tort, il n’y a compensations que si la femme est fautive (art. 102) : dans le cas inverse, elle se retrouve démunie. Après un second mariage, elle perd le droit de garde de ses enfants. En cas de décès de la femme active quel que soit le poste qu’elle occupait, les ayants droit n’ont accès à aucune pension.

Le code de la nationalité 1961 limite le droit de la femme de transmettre sa nationalité à ses enfants (art. 13).

Le code pénal : Tout acteur d’une procédure d’avortement est puni d’une amende et d’une peine d’emprisonnement (art. 293). La sanction des crimes d’attentats à la pudeur sans leur précision exacte (art. 306) entraine des abus de condamnation.

Dans la Pratique

L’application effective des lois relatives à la protection des droits des femmes se heurte au poids des traditions et à la conception patriarcale de la société qui main- tiennent la femme mauritanienne dans une position d’infériorité.

Discriminations dans la famille

Faute d’accès à l’information, le recours au mariage religieux est répandu, ne proté- geant pas légalement les femmes faute de reconnaissance civile. Dans ce cadre, la pratique du mariage des jeunes filles de moins de 18 ans persiste.

''L’Association des Femmes Chefs de Famille (AFCF) répertorie chaque jour un nombre important de cas de filles mineures mariées de force. Oumoulkheiry Mint Sidi Mohamed a été mariée de force à 4 ans puis a divorcé à l’âge 6 ans ; Maya Mint Mohamed, orphe- line de père de 11 ans a été mariée à un homme de 49 ans ; El Moumna Mint Sidi Boya, 10 ans, mariée à un homme de 65 ans...'' Source : AFCF

Les pratiques du lévirat et du sororat sont aussi particulièrement répandues.

''Melle Houraye DEMBA, est une jeune orpheline de 14 ans mariée de force au mari de sa grande sœur décédée. Portée devant la justice, l’affaire a été classée sans suite après instruction, au motif selon lequel le mariage avait été consommé, quand bien même la jeune fille avait déclaré avoir été kidnappée et violée.'' Source : Association Mauritanienne des Droits de l’Homme

Violences

Aucune législation spécifique n’existe sur les violences à l’égard des femmes, faute de quoi les violence domestiques, les viols et d’autres formes d’abus sexuel demeurent largement répandus. La sanction des auteurs de viols est rarement appliquée (art. 309 et 310 du Code pénal), et les femmes victimes sont susceptibles d’être condamnées pour Zina (crime d’adultère puni par la Sharia et le Code pénal mauritanien). Le viol conjugal n’est pas criminalisé.

L’excision, pratique répandue, n’est criminalisée que chez les mineures et uniquement “lorsqu’il en a résulté un préjudice pour l’enfant” (art.12 de l’ordonnance 2005-015 portant protection pénale de l’enfant).

Le gavage, engraissement intensif forcé des jeunes filles pouvant faire appel à des moyens de cœrcition violents, reste répandu et n’est ni reconnu ni interdit par la loi. En 2001, 62 % des femmes gavées avaient été battues et un tiers des femmes avaient subit l’utilisation du zayar. En 2008, l’AFCF a documenté 148 cas de jeunes filles et de femmes victimes de gavages traditionnel et moderne, dont 12 sont décédées suite à l’administration de pilules destinées aux oiseaux.

Esclavage

En dépit de la loi de 2007 criminalisant l’esclavage et les pratiques esclavagistes et de l’interdication du travail forcé par le Code du travail, l’esclavage persiste mas- sivement en Mauritanie, notamment sous la forme de l’exploitation dans le cadre du travail domestique. Les femmes sont particulièrement vulnérables aux abus, y compris sexuels. En 2008, l’AFCF a relevé 202 filles domestiques mineures victimes d’abus sexuels.

Obstacles à l’accès à l’éducation

Le manque d’accès à l’éducation des jeunes filles persiste malgré l’existence de dispositions légales la rendant obligatoire jusqu’à 14 ans en sanctionnant le refus de scolariser un enfant. Le taux d’analphabétisme est très élevé. Leur scolarisation chute dès 12 ans, âge auquel les filles peuvent travailler et deviennent des épouses potentielles.

Obstacles à l’accès à l’emploi

Aucune mesure spécifique pour éliminer la discrimination de fait au travail, ni de loi prohibant le harcèlement sexuel n’existe. Les femmes restent sur-représentées dans le secteur non structuré sans protection sociale et n’ont pas accès à certains emplois dans la magistrature ou aux postes de décision dans l’administration publique.

Obstacles à l’accès à la santé

Les services de santé surtout en milieu rural restent insuffisants, notamment quant aux soins prénataux et postnataux, à la planification familiale. Le taux de grosses- ses précoces est très élevé, et l’insuffisance de traitement des fistules obstétricales entraine de forts taux de mortalités maternelle et infantile. Enfin, l’interdiction totale de l’avortement entraîne un préjudice grave aux femmes en situation de grossesse à risques, tout en encourageant le recours à des avortements non-médicalisés.

LA COALITION DE LA CAMPAGNE DEMANDE AUX AUTORITES DE MAURITANIE DE :

  • Réformer ou abroger toutes les lois discriminatoires, conformément à la CEDAW et au Protocole de Maputo, notamment au sein du Code du statut personnel, du Code sur la nationalité et du Code pénal.

  • Renforcer les lois et politiques visant à lutter contre les violences à l’égard des femmes, notamment en adoptant une loi spécifique criminalisant toutes les formes violences à l’égard des femmes ; en assurant les poursuites et les condamnations des auteurs de violences ; en éliminant de manière définitive l’inculpation des victimes de viol ; en étendant la prohibition des MGF aux femmes majeures; et en mettant en place des foyers d’accueil des victimes.
  • Mettre en place toutes les mesures nécessaires pour garantir l’accès à l’éducation des filles, y compris en instaurant un mécanisme strict de suivi de leur éducation assurant le maintien des jeunes filles à l’école.
  • Améliorer l’accès des femmes aux soins de santé, y compris à la planification familiale ; mettre en place des programmes d’éducation sexuelle à l’attention des filles et des garçons ; et légaliser l’avortement.
  • Mettre en place des programmes de sensibilisation aux droits des femmes à l’égard de tous les acteurs impliqués dans l’application des lois (responsables gouvernementaux, magistrats, avocats, agents de police, chefs religieux et dirigeants communautaires tradtionnels) ; mettre en place des services d’assistance juridique, des numéros d’urgence, des services d’écoute et d’orientation au sein du système judiciaire, d’assistance financière ; et intégrer une éducation citoyenne et en droits humains au cursus scolaire, mettant en lumière les droits des femmes.
  • Ratifier le protocole facultatif à la CEDAW
  • Lever la réserve générale émise à la CEDAW et mettre en œuvre toutes les recommandations émises par le comité CEDAW, en mai 2007.

PRINCIPALES SOURCES

  • Points focaux : AMDH, AFCF
  • L’Association mauritanienne des pratiques ayant effet sur la santé des femmes et des enfants (AMPSFE)
  • Recommandations du Comité CEDAW, juin 2007
  • Mémorandum de l’AFCF sur les insuffisances du Code du Statut Personnel

LES POINTS FOCAUX DE LA CAMPAGNE EN MAURITANIE

L’Association Mauritanienne des Droits de l’Homme (AMDH)

Créée en 1991, l’AMDH est une ONG de défense et de promotion des droits de l’Homme, en Mauritanie et dans la sous-région, menant des actions de surveillance, de protection, d’éducation, de sensibilisation et de vulgarisation des droits humains. Ses principales activités dans le domaine des droits des femmes sont le conseil et la représentation juridiques, la formation, la sensibilisation et le plaidoyer.www.amdhrim.com

L’Association des Femmes Chefs de Famille (AFCF) L’AFCF est une ONG luttant contre les violences faites aux femmes, le trafic et la maltraitance des femmes et des filles, le gavage et la médiation en cas de conflits familiaux. L’AFCF forme des leaderships féminins et œuvre en faveur de la participation politique des femmes, l’amélioration des juridictions nationales, la ratification et le respect des instruments internationaux, la levée de la réserve à la CEDAW et l’application des lois de protection des droits des femmes.www.afcf.asso.st

DOWNLOAD PDF - ENGLISH VERSION

TELECHARGER PDF - VERSION FRANÇAISE

Dossier of Claims: Ghana

RATIFY! Ghana has ratified both the main international and regional instruments protecting women’s rights; the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights of Women in Africa (Maputo Protocol), without reservations. Ghana has also ratified the Optional Protocol to CEDAW.

RESPECT! The Coalition of the Campaign remains particularly concerned by the following violations of women’s rights in Ghana: the persistence of discriminatory laws; violence against women; unequal status in marriage, family, and inheritance matters; unequal access to employment, decision-making, and lack of access to quality health services.

SOME POSITIVE DEVELOPMENTS…

The Coalition of the Campaign acknowledges the recent adoption of several laws and policies aimed at improving respect for women’s rights, including:

  • The adoption of the Human Trafficking Act 2005 which criminalises human trafficking and imposes a sentence of a minimum of 5 years imprisonment for offenders.
  • The establishment of the Domestic Violence Victim Support Unit (DOVVSU) in 2005 within the police service to provide basic support to victims and assist in rehabilitation and reintegration into society. However, at present, the DOVVSU lacks necessary financial and human resources to provide effective services to victims.

BUT DISCRIMINATION AND VIOLENCE PERSIST

In Law

Ghana has a plural legal system consisting of statutory, customary, and religious laws, which creates contradictions and inconsistencies particularly in the areas of marriage and family laws and inheritance and property rights.

Statutory Laws

Criminal offences Act : Marital rape is not criminalised under this law on the basis that consent is implicit within a marriage and cannot be rescinded (s. 42(g)).

Citizenship: Article 7(6) of the Constitution and Section 10(7) of the Citizenship Act add an additional requirement for foreign spouses of Ghanaian women to acquire citizenship.

Religious And Customary Laws

Marriage: Although marriages under the Marriage Ordinance are required to be monogamous, polygamy is permitted under both the Marriage of Mohammedans Ordinance of 1907 and customary law. Nearly all marriages in Ghana are customary.

Custody: The Children’s Act of 1998 grants parental authority and custody rights to both the mother and father equally. However, under customary law, children are deemed to belong to the father’s extended family and upon dissolution of marriage, the husband usually acquires custody of the children.

Inheritance: Under Muslim law, women receive smaller shares of inheritance and family property than their male counterparts.

In Practice

Discrimination in the family

Despite the Children’s Act of 1998, which sets the minimum age of marriage at 18 years, customary practices of early marriages remain. An estimated 16% of women between 15-19 years of age are currently married, divorced or widowed. About 22% of Ghanaian women are estimated to be in polygamous unions, and 40% of women in northern regions live in polygamous relationships.

Violence

Despite the adoption of the Domestic Violence Act 2007, domestic violence remains extremely prevalent in Ghana. It is estimated that 1 in 3 women in Ghana experience it within the family. Statistics from the DOVVSU in 2008 showed that 12,245 cases were reported to the unit in that year. Problems include a general lack of public awareness of legal provisions and insufficient support for victims. Although the Domestic Violence Act prohibit doctors from charging fees for the medical reports required to bring complaints, in practice doctors continue to charge victims resulting in many abandoning their formal complaints.

Rape is criminalised under the Criminal Code but perpetrators are rarely prosecuted and convicted. As of september 2008, the DOVVSU noted few reports of rape, 110 arrests, and only 7 convictions.

Ghana was the first African country to criminalise female genital mutilation (FGM) under the Criminal Code Amendment Act of 1994, yet the practice continues. Its prevalence depends on the ethnic group and region and is difficult to evaluate since data is not available for all groups. In the Bawku area (upper east region), for example, it is estimated that 85% of girls undergo FGM. In Accra and Nsawam (south), FGM reportedly affects girls who have migrated from the north of Ghana and from neighbouring countries.

A new law has recently been adopted to amend Section 796A of the Criminal Code. The law redefines FGM and punishes those who aid and abet in the practice of FGM. Slavery and involuntary servitude are criminalised under article 26 of the Constitution of Ghana. In 1998, parliament enacted an amendment prohibiting “ritual or customary servitude,” and the Human Trafficking Act was adopted in 2005. Yet, the practice of ritual slavery (trokosi) continues in the Volta region. According to this practice, when a relative commits a crime, the family must offer the local shrine a virgin daughter from 8-15 years of age to become a “slave of the gods.” The priest of the shrine exerts full ownership rights and is permitted to beat the girl, demand sex and labour from her, and deny her food, education, and basic health rights. To date, the government has not enforced any legal measures with regard to involuntary servitude. In some of the poorest parts of the country (mainly the Northern, Upper East, Upper West), belief in witchcraft remains widespread. Many poor, often elderly women are accused of being witches and are confined in “witch camps”.

Obstacles to access to employment and under-representation in political and public life

Although existing legislation provides for equal rights to employment, women continue to suffer discrimination, in large part due to a lack of monitoring and enforcement mechanisms. In 2007, it was estimated that 86% of working women were employed in the informal sector. Only 4% of working women were employed in the formal public sector and only 6% in the formal private sector. Women in urban areas who manage to obtain the necessary skills and training encounter resistance in entering non-traditional fields.

Although the government developed a white paper on Affirmative Action in 1998, aimed at increasing women’s representation in public life, no such policy has been adopted and women continue to be significantly under-represented in decision making positions.

Although there is a female speaker of parliament, female attorney general, and female chief justice, Ghana’s parliament only has 19 women of a total of 230 members.

Obstacles to access to health

The adoption of the Reproductive Health Policy and Strategic Plan for Abortion Care has resulted in many improvements to women’s access to health services (more clinics established in districts across the country, traditional birth attendants provided with skills training, free pre-natal care for women). However certain significant challenges remain: application of customary practices, difficult access to hospitals etc. Ghana has a high mortality rate (560 per 100,000 births in 2005), resulting from unsafe abortions, low rates of contraceptive usage and lack of sex education.

THE COALITION OF THE CAMPAIGN CALLS ON THE AUTHORITIES OF GHANA TO:

  • Reform or repeal all discriminatory statutory laws in conformity with CEDAW and the Maputo Protocol.
  • Strengthen other measures to protect women from violence and support victims, including by removing obstacles to victims’ access to justice; ensuring effective prosecution and punishment of offenders; implementing training for all law enforcement personnel, and increasing financial resources allocated to domestic violence programs and services.
  • Improve access, quality, and efficiency of public health care, strengthen efforts to reduce the incidence of maternal and infant mortality, to increase knowledge of and access to affordable contraceptive methods, improve sex education and establish family planning services.
  • Adopt all necessary measures to reform or eliminate cultural practices and stereotypes that discriminate against women, including through awareness-raising programmes targeting women and men, traditional and community leaders.
  • Ratify the optional protocol to CEDAW.
  • Implement all recommendations issued by the CEDAW committee in 2006.

PRINCIPAL SOURCES

  • Focal Point: WILDAF-Ghana
  • CEDAW Committee recommendations, August 2006
  • Ghana WilDAF Shadow Report to the CEDAW Committee, 2006.
  • Wikigender, www.wikigender.org

THE CAMPAIGN FOCAL POINT IN GHANA

  • WILDAF-Ghana

WILDAF-Ghana is a member of the pan African network WILDAF.www.wildaf.org

DOWNLOAD PDF - ENGLISH VERSION

TELECHARGER PDF - VERSION FRANÇAISE

Cahier d'Exigences: Djibouti

RATIFIER ! Si Djibouti a ratifié la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes (CEDAW) et le Protocole à la Charte africaine des droits de l’Homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes en Afrique (Protocole de Maputo), l’Etat n’a toujours pas ratifié le Protocole facultatif à la CEDAW.

RESPECTER ! La Coalition de la campagne est particulièrement préoccupée par : la persistance de dispositions législatives discriminatoires ; les violences à l’égard des femmes ; et l’accès limité à l’éducation, aux postes de prise de décision, à l’héritage et à la santé.

QUELQUES AVANCEES...

La Coalition de la campagne reconnaît quelques développements positifs relatifs aux droits des femmes à Djibouti au cours des dernières années, tels que :

  • La création en 2008 d’un ministère de la Promotion de la femme, du Bien-être familial et des Affaires sociales.
  • La mise en place de la Cellule d’écoute, d’information et d’orientation des femmes et des filles victimes de violence, opérationnelle depuis 2007.
  • La mise en place depuis 2004 d’un Cadre d’action pour la promotion de l’éducation des filles (CAPEF), ainsi que des programmes d’alphabétisation des adultes ciblant particulièrement les femmes.

MAIS LES DISCRIMINATIONS ET LES VIOLENCES PERSISTENT

Dans la Loi

Si la Constitution consacre l’égalité de l’homme et de la femme, des lois discriminatoires persistent, notamment au sein du Code de la famille, adopté en 2002. Par exemple :

Les conditions de validité du mariage : L’article 7 du Code prévoit que “le mariage n’est formé que par le consentement des deux époux et du tuteur de la femme”. Selon cette disposition, la fixation du Mahr (dot) est également une condition pour la validité du mariage.

Les mariages forcés et précoces : Si l’article 13 fixe à 18 ans l’age légal du mariage, l’article 14 prévoit que “Le mariage des mineurs qui n’ont pas atteint l’âge de la majorité légale est subordonné au consentement de leurs tuteurs”.

Le pouvoir marital : Selon l’article 31 “La femme doit respecter les prérogatives du mari en tant que chef de famille et lui doit obéissance dans l’intérêt de la famille. Le mari et la femme doivent remplir leurs devoirs conjugaux, conformément aux usages et à la coutume”.

La polygamie est autorisée par l’article 22. Bien que cette disposition donne la possibilité à toute épouse de remettre en cause un nouveau mariage de son mari, de nombreux mariages demeurent polygames (11,2 % selon une enquête de 2004).

Le délai de viduité : Selon les articles 42 et 43, la femme doit observer un délai de viduité après un divorce ou la mort de son époux de la façon suivante : “La femme divorcée, non enceinte, observera un délai de viduité de trois mois accomplis. Pour la veuve, ce délai est de quatre mois et dix jours accomplis. Le délai de viduité de la femme enceinte prend fin avec l’accouchement.”

De plus, la loi coutumière basée sur la Sharia, et qui continue de s’appliquer dans de nombreux cas, est profondément discriminatoire à l’encontre des femmes, notamment en matière de succession, de divorce et de liberté de déplacement. Par exemple, les femmes n’ont pas le droit de voyager à l’extérieur du pays sans l’autorisation d’un parent adulte de sexe masculin.

Dans la Pratique

De façon générale l’application de lois visant à protéger les droits des femmes à Djibouti se heurte à des obstacles majeurs, notamment : à leur méconnaissance par les femmes; de nombreuses difficultés structurelles, notamment l’extrême pauvreté du pays et le manque de ressources ; ainsi qu’au poids des traditions et des stéréo- types sur le rôle de la femme dans la société.

Violences

Si le Code pénal djiboutien réprime plusieurs formes d’actes de violences, telles que le viol, les actes de torture et “les actes de barbaries” (articles 324 et suivants), les violences domestiques ne sont pas criminalisées de façon explicite et le viol conjugal n’est pas criminalisé. Les violences domestiques sont très répandues à Djibouti et rarement dénoncées. De telles violences sont souvent réglées dans le cadre familial ou traditionnel.

Concernant les mutilations génitales féminines (MGF), malgré les efforts entrepris par le gouvernement, notamment depuis 2005, qui a mis en place de grandes campagnes de sensibilisation impliquant des leaders religieux et communautaires, ces pratiques persistent à Djibouti. Ainsi en 2008, près de 93 % des femmes avaient subi une forme de MGF, traditionnellement opérées sur des filles entre 7 et 10 ans. L’infibulation, forme la plus sévère de MGF, continue à être très largement pratiquée, en particulier dans les zones rurales. Bien que la révision du Code pénal de 1995 ait introduit l’article 333 qui punit les violences amenant à la mutilation génitale de cinq ans de prison et d’une amende de un million de francs djiboutien, personne n’a jamais été inculpé pour ce motif.

Obstacles à l’accès à l’éducation

Bien que la scolarisation soit gratuite et, depuis 2002, obligatoire jusqu’à l’âge de seize ans, et malgré la prise de mesures incitatives (telles que le repas offerts aux enfants dans les cantines scolaires, la distribution de fournitures scolaires, de vêtements pour les filles nouvellement inscrites, la distribution de vivres pour les familles qui scolarisent leur fille, etc.) les taux de scolarisation des filles demeurent très bas : 34 % dans l’enseignement primaire et 17 % dans le secondaire pour la période 2000-2007 selon l’UNICEF.

Aussi bien en ville que dans les zones rurales, la scolarisation de l’enfant appelle à des dépenses parfois trop importantes dans le budget d’une famille à faible revenu ; la priorité est donc souvent donnée à la scolarisation des garçons considérés comme futurs chefs de famille.

Sous représentation dans la vie publique et politique

Les femmes djiboutiennes restent sous représentées aux postes de responsabilités et sont pratiquement exclues de l’ensemble des sphères de décision dans le secteur public ; elles ne représentent que 9 % des agents de l’Etat appartenant à la catégorie A, catégorie hiérarchique la plus élevée. Au dernier scrutin législatif de février 2008, seules 9 femmes ont été élues sur 65 députés, soit 13,85 %. Si une loi sur le système de quota a été adoptée en 2002, afin de renforcer la représentation des femmes dans les postes de prise de décision, elle fixe à seulement 10 % le nombre minimum de femmes dans les fonctions électives et administratives.

Obstacles à l’accès à l’héritage

Malgré les dispositions du Code de la famille qui consacre l’égalité entre hommes et femmes dans ce domaine (art. 101 et suivants), dans la pratique, les femmes continuent à être généralement lésées dans les processus de succession au profit des hommes de leur famille.

Obstacles à l’accès à la santé

Les femmes djiboutiennes souffrent d’un manque d’accès à des services de santé adéquats, notamment en raison du manque d’infrastructures sanitaires et de res- sources humaines et financières. La fécondité élevée, la faible couverture en soins obstétricaux d’urgence et la persistance de pratiques sociales néfastes (excision, infibulation) affectent gravement la santé des femmes et expliquent la persistance d’une mortalité maternelle très importante (évaluée à 650 pour 100 000 naissances vivantes en 2005).

LA COALITION DE LA CAMPAGNE DEMANDE AUX AUTORITES DE DJIBOUTI DE :

  • Réformer toutes les lois discriminatoires de façon à assurer leur conformité avec la CEDAW et le Protocole de Maputo, notamment les dispositions discriminatoires du Code de la famille.
  • Harmoniser le droit statutaire et le droit coutumier, en conformité avec la CEDAW et le Protocole de Maputo, et assurer qu’en cas de contradiction le droit statutaire prévale, notamment sur les questions d’héritage, de divorce et de libre-circulation.
  • Renforcer les lois et politiques pour lutter contre les violences à l’égard des femmes, et notamment : adopter une loi spécifique interdisant toutes les formes de violences faites aux femmes, y compris les violences domestiques et le viol conjugal ; mettre en place des programmes de formation du personnel chargé d’appliquer les lois sur les violences ; mettre en place des campagnes de sensibilisation à destination de la population ; allouer des moyens financiers supplémentaires à la lutte contre les violences domestiques et renforcer le mandat opérationnel de la Cellule d’écoute, d’information et d’orientation des femmes et des filles victimes de violence.
  • Prendre des mesures visant à éliminer les obstacles à l’éducation des filles et des femmes, notamment pour assurer un accès égal à tous niveaux d’éducation, le maintien des filles dans le système éducatif ; mettre en place des programmes de sensibilisation pour dépasser les stéréotypes et les attitudes traditionnelles ; augmenter le budget destiné à l’éducation, permettant notamment la construction d’infrastructures scolaires et une meilleure formation des enseignants.
  • Prendre des mesures visant à favoriser l’accès des femmes aux postes de prise de décision, y compris en réformant la loi sur le quota pour augmenter le pourcentage minimum.
  • Prendre des mesures destinées à assurer à toutes les femmes un accès à des soins de santé, y compris des services de soins obstétriques et de planification familiale, notamment : en lançant des campagnes de sensibilisation pour informer la population sur les moyens de contraception ; en assurant l’accès des femmes à la contraception, en particulier dans les zones rurales ; et en allouant des fonds supplémentaires à la santé afin d’augmenter le nombre d’infrastructures sanitaires et de personnel qualifié et la qualité des soins.
  • Adopter toutes les mesures nécessaires pour réformer ou éliminer les pratiques culturelles et les stéréotypes qui discriminent les femmes, à travers des programmes de vulgarisation des textes de loi et de sensibilisation à destination des hommes et des femmes, y compris les responsables gouvernementaux, les chefs religieux, les dirigeants communautaires et traditionnels.
  • Ratifier le protocole facultatif à la CEDAW.

PRINCIPALES SOURCES

  • Point focal : LDDH
  • UNICEF, www.unicef.org
  • L’OIF, www.genre.francophonie.org
  • L’Union interparlementaire, www.ipu.org
  • PNUD Djibouti

LE POINT FOCAL DE LA CAMPAGNE A DJIBOUTI

Ligue djiboutienne des droits humains (LDDH)

Créée en 1999, la ligue djiboutienne mène de nombreuses actions pour la promotion et la défense des droits de l’Homme à Djibouti : surveillance des violations des droits humains, dénonciations dans le cadre de la prévention des risques de conflits sociaux, lutte contre l’impunité, activités de formation et d’information en matière de droits humains. www.lddh-djibouti.or

DOWNLOAD PDF - ENGLISH VERSION

TELECHARGER PDF - VERSION FRANÇAISE

Dossier of Claims: Liberia

RATIFY! Liberia has ratified the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa (Maputo Protocol) without reservations. However, Liberia has not yet ratified the Optional Protocol to CEDAW.

RESPECT! Despite the ratification of the CEDAW in 1984, it has yet to be incorpo- rated into Liberian law and is not justiciable in Liberian courts. The Coalition of the Campaign remains particularly concerned by the following continued violations of women’s rights in Liberia: the persistence of discriminatory laws; unequal status within the family; violence against women; and limited access to education, employ- ment, decision-making positions and health services.

SOME POSITIVE DEVELOPMENTS…

The Coalition of the Campaign acknowledges the recent adoption of several laws and policies aimed at improving respect for women’s rights, including:

  • The enactment of the 2008 Gender and Sexually Based Violence Act, which provides for the establishment of a specialized court to try cases of sexual violence.
  • The enactment of the 2006 Law on rape which includes spousal rape within the definition of rape.
  • The creation of the National Gender-based Violence Plan of Action (2006) and the National Policy on Girls’ Education (2006).
  • The election of Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf as President in 2005, making Liberia the first African country to elect a woman President.
  • The ratification of the Maputo Protocol in 2008.

BUT DISCRIMINATION AND VIOLENCE PERSIST

In Law

Liberia has a dual legal system consisting of statutory and customary law. While Liberia has made efforts with the support of the United Nations Mission in Liberia to review national laws that discriminate against women, discriminatory statutory and customary laws remain in force particularly in the areas of family law.

Discriminatory provisions in statutory law include:

Nationality and citizenship: Under the 1973 Alien and Nationality Law, a child born abroad to a Liberian mother and a non-Liberian father is not automatically granted the mother’s nationality.

Discriminatory provisions under customary law include:

Married women are not allowed to appear before traditional courts without their husbands.

Women have no right to parental authority and no right to custody of children in the event of divorce or upon the husband’s death despite the passage of a new civil law on shared custody.

Although civil law allows for equal rights to inheritance and property, customary law does not allow for married woman to inherit from their husbands.

Polygamy, although prohibited under statutory law, is permitted under customary law.

In Practice

Discrimination in the family

The custom of early marriages remains widespread and many girls are married at age 12 or 13. In 2004, it was estimated that 36% of girls between age 15 and 19 years were married, divorced or widowed. More than one third of married women in Liberia between the age of 15 and 49 live in polygamous marriages.

Violence

Domestic violence, although prohibited by law, remains a widespread problem. Crimes of sexual violence are highly prevalent in Liberia. During the conflict, women and girls were particularly vulnerable to such crimes, which were generally committed with complete impunity. Under the Gender and Sexually Based Violence Act 2008, the crime of rape carries a sentence from 7 years to life imprisonment, however implementation of the law is inadequate. Despite recent government efforts, there remain insufficient services to support victims and access to justice is limited.There is no law prohibiting female genital mutilation (FGM) and this practice remains widespread. An estimated 50% of women in Liberia have undergone some form of FGM.

Despite the passage of the 2005 Anti-Human Trafficking Act, human trafficking remains a serious problem in Liberia particularly for domestic work and other labour. Young women are especially at high risk for trafficking. Although penalties for trafficking range from one year to life imprisonment, enforcement remains weak.

Obstacles to access to education and employment

Despite ongoing efforts aimed at increasing enrolment and retention of girls in schools, structural and traditional barriers to the education of girls persist, including gender-based stereotypes and harmful traditional practices such as early marriage and teenage pregnancies. Furthermore, girls are vulnerable to sexual harassment in schools in the absence of laws penalising such harassment. Liberian women also face obstacles concerning access to employment. Women are highly concentrated in the informal sector and lack rights and social benefits including maternity protections.

Under-representation in political life

Although there have been some efforts made to increase women’s participation in public and political life, there remains a low level of participation of women at the highest levels of decision-making due in part to prevailing social and cultural attitudes. As of 2008, there were 4 female ministers, 12 female deputy ministers, 5 women in the Senate, 9 women in the House of Representatives, 5 female county superintendents, 1 female mayor of Monrovia, and 2 female Supreme Court associate justices.

Obstacles to access to health

Liberia’s health-care infrastructure was strongly affected by the conflict. Liberia lacks basic resources and capacity to implement its health-care policies. Liberia has high rates of maternal mortality (1200 per 100,000 births), due in part to the lack of sexual and reproductive health services and post-natal care, the lack of sex education and contraceptive usage, and the high rate of teenage pregnancy. HIV/AIDS is prevalent, particularly amongst women.

THE COALITION OF THE CAMPAIGN CALLS ON THE AUTHORITIES OF LIBERIA TO:

  • Reform or repeal all discriminatory statutory laws in conformity with CEDAW and the Maputo Protocol.
  • Harmonize statutory and customary laws in conformity with CEDAW and the Maputo Protocol and ensure that where conflicts arise between statutory provisions and customary law, statutory provisions prevail.
  • Strengthen other measures to protect women from violence and support victims, including by removing obstacles to victims’ access to justice; ensuring effective prosecution and punishment of offenders; implementing training for all law enforcement personnel; and establishing shelters for women victims of violence.
  • Increase efforts to ensure women’s equal access to education and employment, including measures to ensure equal access at all levels of education and by regulating the informal sector.
  • Improve access, quality, and efficiency of public health care, strengthen efforts to reduce the incidence of maternal and infant mortality, increase awareness of and access to affordable contraceptive methods, improve sex education and establish family planning services.
  • Adopt all necessary measures to reform or eliminate cultural practices and stereotypes that discriminate against women, including through awareness raising programmes targeting women and men, traditional and community leaders.
  • Ratify the optional protocol to CEDAW.
  • Implement all recommendations issued by the CEDAW committee in July 2009.

PRINCIPAL SOURCES

  • Focal Point: RWHR
  • CEDAW Committee Recommendations, July 2009.
  • Wikigender, www.wikigender.org

THE CAMPAIGN FOCAL POINT IN LIBERIA

  • Regional Watch for Human Rights (RWHR)

Regional Watch for Human Rights (formerly Liberia Watch for Human Rights) monitors compliances wtih human rights standards, assesses human rights situation in West African countries, and pressurizes governments and other influential actors to change their practices in order to improve respect for human rights. http://blog.rwhr.org

DOWNLOAD PDF - ENGLISH VERSION

TELECHARGER PDF - VERSION FRANÇAISE

Dossier of Claims: Kenya

RATIFY! Although Kenya ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1984, it has not yet ratified the Optional Protocol to CEDAW or the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa (Maputo Protocol).

RESPECT! The Coalition of the Campaign remains particularly concerned about the following continued violations of women’s rights: the persistence of discrimina- tory laws and traditional harmful practices, in particular in the area of the family; violence; obstacles to access to education; under-representation in political life; and obstacles to access to property and health services. The Coalition of the Campaign is also concerned about delays in adoption of legislation that eliminates discrimina- tion and protects women’s human rights. Bills pending before parliament include: the Family Protection Bill 2007, the Marriage Bill 2008, the Domestic Violence Bill 1999, the Matrimonial Property Bill 2008, the Equal Opportunities Bill 2008 and the Affirmative Action Bill 2000.

SOME POSITIVE DEVELOPMENTS…

The Coalition of the Campaign acknowledges the recent adoption of several laws and policies aimed at improving respect for women’s rights, including:

  • The adoption of the Sexual Offences Act (SOA) in 2006 (enacted in 2008). This Act Harmonises sexual violence legislation into a single law, provides a comprehensive definition of rape, introduces minimum sentences, criminalises sexual harassment and expands sexual offenses to include: gang rape, deliberate infection with sexually transmitted diseases, trafficking for sexual exploitation and child pornography.
  • The adoption of two Regulations in 2008 to guide judicial officials in the implementation of the Sexual Offenses Act: the Sexual Offences Regulations and the Sexual Offences Dangerous Offenders DNA Data Bank Regulations.
  • The introduction, in 2008, of government subsidies to secondary schools to cover tuition and related costs. As a result, the number of students in secondary education, in particular female students, has increased.

BUT DISCRIMINATION AND VIOLENCE PERSIST

In Law

Kenya has a unified legal system based on the common law system. However, according to the Constitution, family law continues to be governed by customary Christian, Islamic and Hindu laws, alongside statutory law. Despite ongoing discussions on the harmonisation of such laws, discriminatory provisions remain widespread within each source of law with regard to marriage, divorce and custody of children. Qadis’ courts apply personal status law for the Muslim population.

Discriminatory provisions of the common law include:

Constitution: While article 70 provides for equality between men and women, article 82(4) exempts certain laws from the prohibition against discrimination in the areas of adoption, marriage, divorce, burial, devolution of property on death and other matters of personal law, as well as tribal and customary laws. Furthermore articles 89 and 91 prohibit women passing their nationality to their husbands and restrict their rights to transfer nationality to their children.

Family law: According to the Matrimonial Causes Ordinance, children are defined as males who have not attained the age of 16 and females who have not attained the age of 13 (art. 2). Wives can be prosecuted for adultery but husbands cannot be (art. 11). freedom of movement: Under the Domicile Act women must have their husbands’ or fathers’ consent to obtain passports (Ch. 37).

Property: The Law of Succession Act terminates the inheritance rights of widows if they remarry. A widow cannot be the sole administrator of her husband’s estate unless she has her children’s consent (art. 35).

Discriminatory customary and religious laws include:

Marriage: Whilst statutory law fixes the minimum age for marriage at 18 (Children’s Act, 2001), customary and religious laws authorise early marriages. Customary and Muslim laws authorise polygamy.

Divorce: Muslim laws provide for men to repudiate their wives (unilateral termination of marriage by pronouncing the intention to divorce three times). Under Muslim laws women cannot divorce their husbands. custody: Under customary law, the father has custody of the children.

In Practice

Discrimination in the family

In addition to the application of discriminatory statutory, customary and religious laws, discriminatory traditional practices include the payment of a bride price, and wife inheritance, or levirate, wherein a widow is “inherited” by a male relative of her deceased husband.

Violence

Domestic violence remains widespread and perpetrators continue to benefit from impunity. There is no specific legislation criminalising domestic violence. Marital rape is not criminalised. A Domestic Violence Bill, which includes a provision sanctioning marital rape, has been pending since 1999. Law enforcement officials are generally reluctant to investigate domestic violence reports as they are considered “domestic issues.” Rape is extremely prevalent. Although the Penal Code, section 139, criminalises rape and provides for a sentence of up to life imprisonment, the rate of reporting and prosecution remains low due to victims’ fear of retribution, police reluctance to intervene, poor training of prosecutors, and unavailability of medical personnel.

The traditional practice of ritual “cleansing” of widows, which involves forcing them to have sex with a social outcast, usually without protection, persists in some communities. Women living in the Internally Displaced Persons camps across Kenya are also particularly vulnerable to rape and other crimes of sexual violence.

Despite legal prohibition (Children’s Act, 2001), female genital mutilation (FGM) remains widely practiced, with prevalence varying considerably depending on ethnic group. In addition, the legal prohibition does not apply to women over the age of 18. In 2009, it was estimated that 40% of women have undergone FGM in Kenya.

Obstacles to access to education

Despite the provision of free and compulsory primary and secondary education, girls’ access to education remains limited, in part due to traditional attitudes, as well as high dropout rates due to pregnancy and early and forced marriage (estimated 80,000 annually). The Education Act provides for the right of pregnant girls to continue education until and after giving birth, but pregnant girls continue to be expelled from schools.

Under-representation in political life

Kenyan women continue to remain underrepresented in political and public life. In 2009, women composed 9.8% of elected members in Parliament, 5.8% of ministers in Government, and 27% of ambassadors and high commissioners in the diplomatic service. There are no women judges in the Court of Appeal. Despite lobbying efforts by women’s rights organizations, the Affirmative Action Bill 2000, which imposes a 30% quota for all government appointments remains pending.

Obstacles to access to property

Although the Law of Succession Act provides for the surviving spouse to inherit the entire marital estate, many widows are deprived of inheritance (art. 35). The husband’s family often evicts the widow from her home and confiscates other marital property. The Matrimonial Property Bill 2008, aims at removing these inequalities, but remains pending. Women constitute 75% of the agricultural workforce, however they only hold 6% of all land titles.

Obstacles to access to health

The maternal mortality rate (560 per 100,000 births) remains high, due to lack of skilled birth attendants, malaria, HIV/AIDS, low rates of contraceptive usage, and unsafe abortions. Women lack access to quality sexual and reproductive health services, family planning services, contraception and sexual education.

THE COALITION OF THE CAMPAIGN CALLS ON THE AUTHORITIES OF KENYA TO:

  • Reform or repeal all discriminatory statutory laws in conformity with CEDAW and the Maputo Protocol, including discriminatory provisions within the Constitution, Matrimonial Causes Ordinance, Domicile Act and the Law of Succession Act.
  • Harmonise statutory, customary, and religious laws in conformity with CEDAW and the Maputo protocol and ensure that where conflicts arise the statutory provisions prevail.
  • Strengthen measures to eliminate discrimination within the family, including by urgently adopting the Family Protection Bill (2007) and the Marriage Bill (2008).
  • Strengthen laws and policies to protect women from violence and support victims, including by adopting the Domestic Violence Bill; extending the prohibition of FGM to adult women; removing obstacles to victims’ access to justice; ensuring effective prosecution and punishment of offenders; implementing training for all law enforcement personnel and health workers; increasing financial resources allocated to domestic violence programs and services; implementing public awareness campaigns targeting women and men, traditional and community leaders and adopting a zero tolerance policy on all forms of violence against women.
  • Ensure women’s access to education including by implementing the provision of the Education Act concerning the right of pregnant girls to continue education; and addressing socio-economic and cultural factors that impede access to education.
  • Ensure women’s representation in decision-making positions, including by adopting the Affirmative Action Bill 2000.
  • Ensure women’s access to property, including through the adoption of the Matrimonial Property Bill 2008 and through measures facilitating women’s access to land.
  • Ensure women’s access to health, and strengthen efforts to reduce the incidence of maternal mortality, by increasing knowledge of and access to affordable contraceptive methods and reproductive health services, improving sex education programmes and establishing family planning services.
  • Ratify the optional protocol to CEDAW and the Maputo protocol.

PRINCIPAL SOURCES

  • Focal Point: KHRC
  • CEDAW Committee Recommendations, July 2007
  • OMCT, Alternative Report to the UN Committee against Torture, June 2009
  • Wikigender, www.wikigender.org

THE CAMPAIGN FOCAL POINT IN KENYA

  • Kenya Human Rights Commission (KHRC)

KHRC is an independent human rights NGO, established in 1992 with the vision of entrenching human rights and democratic values in Kenya. The Mission of KHRC is to promote, protect and enhance the realisation of all human rights for all individuals and groups. One of the main objectives within KHRC’s Strategic Plan for 2008-2012, is mainstreaming equality, non discrimination, and respect for diversity.www.khrc.or.ke

DOWNLOAD PDF - ENGLISH VERSION

TELECHARGER PDF - VERSION FRANÇAISE

Wednesday 13 January 2010

Une avancée pour les femmes en Ouganda ?

ENGLISH VERSION

Source : Womensnews
Par Claire Hoi

Le 11 novembre dernier, l'Assemblée Nationale Ougandais a finalement adopté une loi incriminant les violences domestiques. Parallèlement, le 10 décembre dernier a marqué une victoire pour les défenseurs des droits des femmes quand une loi s'opposant aux violences génitales faites aux femmes fut de même acceptée.

On espère que ces développements ouvriront la voie à l'adoption d'autres réformes sur les droits des femmes, en particulier celles concernant les discriminations dans les domaines du mariage et du divorce.

Un projet de loi sur le mariage et le divorce est actuellement devant l' Assemblée Nationale. Il octroiera aux femmes le droit de divorce pour violence, le liberté de choix de l'époux, ainsi que l'abolition de la pratique traditionnelle du lévirat. Par ailleurs, la polygamie sera interdite.

De plus, il instaurera un partage équitable des biens et propriétés dans le cas de divorce.

Cependant, cette loi s'appliquerait aux chrétiens, aux hindouistes et aux mariages traditionnels, excluant les mariages musulmans. Ainsi, de nombreuses femmes en Ouganda – où la population musulmanne est estimée à 12 % - seraient exclues de son application.

Enfin, le projet de loi ne s'oppose pas à la pratique traditionnelle de la dot, aussi appellée « le prix de la mariée », qui a tendance à dissuader les femmes victimes d'abus à quitter leur mari, par peur de devoir rendre cette dot. Cependant le projet interdit le remboursement de cette dot en cas de divorce.

Steps forward for women in Uganda?

VERSION FRANÇAISE

Source: Womensnews
By Claire Hoi

On 11 November 2009, The Ugandan National Assembly finally adopted a law criminalising domestic violence. On 10 December, defenders of women's rights won a further victory when a bill prohibiting female genital mutilation flew through parliament. These two new laws are currently awaiting signature by the President to take effect.

It is hoped that these developments may also pave the way for the adoption of further reforms on women's rights, in particular concerning discrimination in the areas of marriage and divorce.

A draft law on marriage and divorce is currently before Parliament. The draft law grants women the right to divorce spouses for cruelty, the right to choose their spouse and the abolition of the customary practice of widow inheritance. Polygamy is prohibited. It also provides for equal division of property and finances in the event of divorce.

However, the proposed law would govern Christian, Hindu, and traditional marriages but not Muslim marriages. Thus many women in Uganda - where an estimated 12 % of the population are Muslims - would be excluded from its application.

Furthermore, the current bill does not prohibit the traditional practice of the husband's family giving marriage gifts to the wife's family, the so-called « bride price »,which can inhibit abused woman from leaving their husbands for fear that they could demand refund of the gifts. However, in the proposed legislation, bride price will not be returnable in the event of divorce.

Sunday 11 October 2009

هل رفع المغرب تحفظاته على اتفاقية سيداو؟ خطاب الخارج وخطاب الداخل

VERSION FRANÇAISE

منذ الرسالة الملكية، المؤرخة بعاشر ديسمبر 2008 ، بمناسبة الذكرى الستين للإعلان العالمي لحقوق الإنسان، والتي تم الإعلان فيها عن " رفع الدولة المغربية لتحفظاتها على اتفاقية القضاء على جميع أشكال التمييز ضد المرأة" (سيداو)، ونحن نتوصل من شخصيات ومنظمات عدة، برسائل التهاني على الخطوة النوعية الجديدة لبلادنا نحو تكريس مبدأ المساواة. لكن، وكلما أردنا الجواب على تلك الرسائل، أو طلب منا في تظاهرات إقليمية أو دولية أن نتحدث عن التجربة المغربية في مجال رفع التحفظات، إلا وتجددت حيرتنا. فإلى اليوم، وبعد مرور عشرة شهور بالضبط، لم يعلن بعد، وبشكل رسمي، على التدابير والإجراءات العملية التي اتخذتها الحكومة المغربية بشأن تفعيل ذلك الإعلان .

كل الذين أتيحت لهم فرصة الاستماع لتصريحات المسؤولين المغاربة في المحافل الدولية، من جنيف الى نيويورك، أو أي محافل أخرى في العالم، يقفون، انطلاقا من خطابات هؤلاء، على إرادة المغرب الحقيقية للإيفاء بالالتزامات التي أعلن عنها مرارا، وعلى استجابته أخيرا لتوصيات لجنة سيداو، المتكررة منذ أن أصبح دولة طرف في الاتفاقية سنة 1993، وذلك برفع التحفظات... كل التحفظات.

أما أولائك الذين يتقصون الأمر في الداخل، باستفسار الجهات المعنية عن مصير التحفظات، فإن ما يستشف من ردود الأفعال، يقول أن المغرب قد اكتفى في الواقع، بإعداد وثائق رفع بتلك التحفظات الجزئية التي صرح بها سنة 2006، عندما قدم ترشيحه لعضوية مجلس حقوق الإنسان، مبقيا على جوهرها المتمثل في المواد 2 و15 و 16 ، أو على أحسن تقدير، تغيير التحفظات بإعلانات تفسيرية.

بالمناسبة، وعلى هامش اليوم الوطني للنساء المغربيات، الذي يصادف هذه السنة، الذكرى الثلاثين لاتفاقية سيداو، وفي سياق الحملة الوطنية والاقليمة " المساواة دون تحفظ"، يحق لنا أن نتسائل كي نرد على المهنئين والمهنئات:

- هل نأخذ بخطاب الخارج الذي يوحي بالتزام غير منقوص بمقتضيات الاتفاقية ؟ - أم نكتفي، بما يوحي به خطاب الداخل، من تعامل انتقائي مع تلك المقتضيات.. و بخيبة الأمل؟

الجمعية الديمقراطية لنساء المغرب 10 أكتوبر 2009

Le Maroc a-t-il levé les réserves sur la CEDAW ? Les ambiguïtés d’un double discours

Association Démocratique des Femmes du Maroc

Communiqué de presse

VERSION ARABE

Depuis le message royal du 10 décembre 2008 à l’occasion du 60ème anniversaire de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme qui annonçait la levée par le Maroc, état partie à la CEDAW depuis 1993, de ses réserves sur cette convention, nous n’avons pas cessé de recevoir des messages de félicitations de la part de personnalités et organisations nationales et internationales à propos de la nouvelle étape franchie par notre pays en matière de consécration du principe de l’égalité.

Mais à chaque fois que nous sommes sollicitées pour participer à une manifestation, parler de l’expérience marocaine ou pour répondre aux messages de félicitations, nous sommes confrontées à un dilemme. En effet, à ce jour, 10 mois après, aucune information officielle n’a filtré sur les mesures opérationnelles prises par le gouvernement marocain pour la mise en œuvre de cette déclaration.

Tous ceux et celles qui ont eu l’occasion d’écouter les discours des responsables marocains devant les instances internationales à Genève, à New-York ou ailleurs, sont rassurés quant à la volonté réelle du Maroc d’honorer les engagements pris et de répondre aux recommandations du comité CEDAW en matière de levée des réserves….. de toutes les réserves.

Quant à ceux qui suivent la situation de l’intérieur, les informations disponibles laissent croire que le Maroc s’est contenté en réalité de préparer les instruments d’une levée partielle sur les réserves, annoncée déjà en mars 2006 et à l’occasion de la candidature du Maroc au Conseil des droits de l’homme en 2007. Or, selon certaines sources autorisées, les réserves sur les dispositions qui ont directement trait au but et à l’objet de la CEDAW, à savoir les articles 2, 15 et 16 seront maintenues ou, au mieux, remplacées par des déclarations explicatives.

Ainsi, à l’occasion de la célébration de la journée des femmes marocaines qui coïncide cette année avec le 30ème anniversaire de la CEDAW et dans le cadre de la campagne nationale et régionale « Egalité sans réserve », nous sommes en droit de poser les questions suivantes afin d’être en mesure de répondre aux messages de félicitations:

- Faut-il prendre en considération le discours adressé à l’extérieur qui laisse supposer un engagement total de l’Etat marocain en matière de levée de toutes les réserves? - Ou alors, faut-il plutôt croire au discours dirigé vers l’intérieur qui renvoie, selon toute vraisemblance, à une levée limitée et sans réelle portée de certaines réserves ?

Association Démocratique des Femmes du Maroc ADFM Rue Ibn Mokla, n° 2 Quartier des Orangers. Rabat Tél : +212 537 70 60 81 / +212 537 73 71 65 Fax : +212 537 26 08 13 site web:www.adfm.ma Email: contact@adfm.ma ; association.adfm@menara.ma

Friday 10 July 2009

ENGAGEZ VOUS POUR LES DROITS DES FEMMES !

Communiqué de presse

La coalition l'Afrique pour les droits des femmes : ratifier et respecter lance un appel aux Etats n'ayant toujours pas ratifié le Protocole à la Charte africaine relatif aux droits de la femme en Afrique

english version

Le 11 juillet 2009 - Aujourd'hui le Protocole à la Charte africaine des droits de l'Homme et des peuples relatif aux droits de la femme en Afrique fêtera ses six ans. Adopté en 2003 à Maputo, Mozambique, et entré en vigueur en 2005, le Protocole a désormais été ratifié par la majorité des Etats africains qui se sont engagés à «éliminer toutes formes de discrimination à l'égard des femmes et (à) assurer la protection des droits de la femme». Cependant 26 Etats n'ont toujours pas ratifié le Protocole** .

Ce texte extrêmement important, à l'instar de la Convention des Nations unies sur l'élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l'égard des femmes (Convention CEDAW) ratifiée par la quasi totalité des Etats africains, offre un cadre juridique de référence pour assurer le respect des droits humains des femmes: élimination des discriminations et des pratiques néfastes; droit à la vie et à l'intégrité physique; égalité des droits en matière civile et familiale ; accès à la justice; droit de participation au processus politique; protection dans les conflits armés; droits économiques et protection sociale; droit à la santé et à la sécurité alimentaire, etc.

Convaincues que la lutte contre les discriminations et les violences à l'égard des femmes passe par la modification du cadre législatif, plus d'une centaine d'associations ont lancé, le 8 mars dernier la campagne «L'Afrique pour les droits des femmes: Ratifier et Respecter» appelant les États africains à ratifier le Protocole de Maputo et les autres instruments de protection des droits humains des femmes et à tout mettre en oeuvre pour garantir le respect de leurs dispositions.

Menée par la Fédération internationale des ligues des droits de l'Homme (FIDH), en coopération avec cinq organisations régionales africaines*** , cette campagne est soutenue par de nombreuses personnalités, telles les prix Nobel de la paix Mgr Desmond Tutu et Shirin Ebadi, les prix Nobel de littérature, Wole Soyinka et Nadine Gordimer, par les artistes Angélique Kidjo, Tiken Jah Fakoly et Youssou N'Dour ou encore par Mme Soyata Maiga, Rapporteure spéciale de la Commission africaine des droits de l'Homme et des peuples sur les droits des femmes en Afrique.

Toutes les organisations et personnalités signataires de la campagne vous appellent par conséquent à saisir l'occasion de l'anniversaire du Protocole à la Charte africaine sur les droits de la femme en Afrique pour le ratifier et ainsi affirmer vos engagements en faveur des droits des femmes dans vos pays.


** Algérie, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroun, Congo-Brazzaville, Côte d'Ivoire, Egypte, Erythrée, Ethiopie, Gabon, Guinée, Guinée équatoriale, Kenya, Madagascar, Maurice, Niger, Ouganda, République centrafricaine, Sao Tome et Principe, Sierra Leone, Somalie, Soudan, Swaziland, Tchad, Tunisie


*** Femmes Africa Solidarités (FAS), Women in Law in South Africa (WLSA), African Center for Democracy and Human Rights Studies (ACDHRS), Women in Law and Development in Africa (WILDAF) et Women's aid Collective (WACOL)

COMMIT TO THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN'S RIGHTS!

Press Statement

The coalition of the campaign "Africa for women's rights : ratify and respect !" issues a call to states that have failed to ratify the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women in Africa

version française

11 July 2009 - Today marks the sixth anniversary of the adoption of the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa. Adopted in 2003 in Maputo, Mozambique, the Protocol entered into force in 2005 and has now been ratified by the majority of African states which have thus committed themselves to “ensur(ing) that the rights of women are promoted, realised and protected”. However, 26 States have yet to ratify the Protocol** .

This Protocol, like the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW Convention) which has been ratified by almost all African States, provides a legal framework of reference for ensuring respect for women's human rights: elimination of discrimination and harmful practices; right to life and to physical integrity; equality in the domain of the family and civil rights; access to justice; right to participate in the political process; protection in armed conflicts; economic rights and social protection; right to health and food security, etc.

Convinced that the fight against discrimination and violence against women requires changes to the the legal framework, on 8 March this year over one hundred organisations launched the campaign “Africa for Women's Rights: Ratify and Respect” calling on African States to ratify the Maputo Protocol and the other women's rights protection instruments and to take all necessary measures to guarantee respect of their provisions.

Initiated by the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), in cooperation with five African regional organisations*** , this campaign has the support of patrons including the Nobel Peace Prize Laureates Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Shirin Ebadi, the Nobel Literature Prize Laureates Wole Soyinka and Nadine Gordimer, the artists Angélique Kidjo, Tiken Jah Fakoly and Youssou N'Dour, as well as Ms. Soyata Maiga, Special Rapporteur of the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa.

All the organisations involved in the campaign, and the campaign's patrons, call on the Presidents of the 26 states that have not yet done so, to seize the occasion of this anniversary to ratify the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women in Africa and thus affirm their commitments to respecting the rights of women.


** Algeria, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo-Brazzaville, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Niger, Saharawi Arabic Democratic Republic, Sao Tome et Principe, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Tunisia, Uganda


*** Femmes Africa Solidarités (FAS), Women in Law in South Africa (WLSA), African Center for Democracy and Human Rights Studies (ACDHRS), Women in Law and Development in Africa (WILDAF) et Women's aid Collective (WACOL)

Wednesday 22 April 2009

La RDC ratifie le Protocole sur les droits des femmes en Afrique!

Depuis le 9 février 2009, la République Démocratique du Congo a ratifié le Protocole à la Charte africaine des droits de l'homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes.

La RDC est le 26 ème Etat du continent à ratifier le Protocole à la CADHP relatif aux droits des femmes et le second Etat d'Afrique Centrale, après le Rwanda en 2004, à franchir ce pas significatif.

La campagne se félicite de cette avancée. Toutefois, il ne s'agit que d'une promesse qui devra par la suite être suivie d'effets. Les acteurs de la campagne "l'Afrique pour les droits des femmes" attendent maintenant des actions concrètes démontrant la volonté des autorités congolaises de respecter leurs engagements internationaux. Enfin, la campagne appelle la RDC à ratifier et respecter le Protocole à la Convention CEDAW qui permet aux femmes victimes de violations de leurs droits de déposer des plaintes devant un comité des Nations Unies.

A quoi sert ce Protocole ? Cette convention régionale, adoptée sous l'égide de l'Union Africaine à Maputo (Mozambique) en 2003 à la suite d’une lutte acharnée des organisations africaines de défense des droits des femmes, est entrée en vigueur en 2005. Ce texte oblige les Etats à garantir aux femmes leurs droits fondamentaux. Certains des droits et obligations énumérés sont particulièrement pertinents dans le contexte africain comme la prohibition des pratiques traditionnelles néfastes (excision, lévirat, sororat, mariage précoce, forcé...) ou l’obligation d’apporter une protection spécifique aux femmes dans les conflits armés. Ce Protocole représente par ailleurs une avancée considérable en matière de droits reproductifs. Cinq ans après son adoption, 27 Etats ne l'ont toujours pas ratifié.

Congo_Rep_Dem_carte.gif

Monday 16 February 2009

MAP / CARTE RATIFICATIONS

L'un des principaux objectifs de la campagne est d'amener les Etats du continent africain à ratifier:

  • la Convention des Nations Unies sur l'élimination de toutes les formes de discriminations à l'égard des femmes (CEDAW)
  • le Protocole à la CEDAW
  • Le Protocole à la Charte africaine des droits de l'homme et des peuples relatif aux droits des femmes

Pour en savoir plus sur ces conventions

Vert: les pays qui ont ratifié ces 3 instruments
Jaune: ceux qui en ont ratifié seulement 2
Orange: ceux qui n'en ont ratifié qu'1
Rouge: ceux qui n'en ont ratifié aucun

Le fait qu'un pays ait ratifié une convention ne signifie pas forcément qu'il la respecte.


page 2 of 2 -